DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

"Another Look Curriculum: Pattern"

Kindergarten

Mt. Royal Elementary School, Baltimore MD

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Internship II: September 2010: Elementary Another Look Lesson - Patterns

Mt.Royal Elementary Kindergarten with Ms. Nicole Black

 

K_Pattern_LessonPlan.pdf

 

Big Ideas:

Students will learn to become aware of the characteristics that make up a pattern and to identify patterns. They will recognize pattern by the regular way lines, shapes, or colors are repeated. Students will distinguish  the difference between a pattern and shapes or colors that occur in a random way and do not form a pattern.

(Another Look Curriculum - Patterns) “to show the child that shapes or combinations of shapes or colors that are repeated in a regular way form a pattern. To show the child that the same shapes or colors can occur in a random way and not form a pattern.”

 

Essential Questions: 

What is pattern? What is not pattern?

 

Key Objective: 

Students will be able to identify a pattern and recreate one with the use of basic shapes and colors. (“We will be able to identify a pattern and a non-pattern as well as create our own pattern using shapes and color.”)

 

Art Problem: 

Using paint and sponge stamps of various shapes, students will create a repeated pattern with alternating shapes and/or colors. (Students will create a composition of shapes that when viewed together creates a pattern, they will consider shape and color while planning their composition.) For young children“the first set of organized artistic behavior - adaptation of tool use”

 

Objectives -

Concepts:

  • Students will understand that repeated single shapes create a pattern, as well as Alternating shapes can create a pattern (square, circle, square, circle) 
  • Alternating color can create a pattern(red circle, green circle, red circle, green circle)
  • Alternating shapes and colors can create a pattern (red circle, green square, red circle, green square)

 

Skills:

  • Students will be able to define what a pattern is, and visually distinguish one.
  • Students will learn how to use tools and materials: sponge stamps, paint, kindergarten students are “discovering that motions made with a tool on a surface create a mark...they can control their motions to make desired marks” 2
  • Students will distinguish what type of composition makes a pattern

 

Dispositions:

  • Students will show being able to work together sharing the materials, the paint and the sponges placed at each table
  • Students will approach their work with an openness to experiencing new techniques and an understanding of new concept. “they have made something where nothing was before” (Burton, 1980)

 

Key Concepts:

  • Pattern can be created by repeating line, shape, or color
  • Pattern can be regular or alternating
  • Pattern can be recognized with the use of basic shapes and colors, kindergarten students use the strategy of “reducing what is seen into basic or simple shapes” (Smith, 1998)
  • Pattern can be predicted in a sequence
  • Pattern can be found on man made and natural objects
  • Artists use patterns as well as geometric imagery that do not create patterns

 

Art Concepts:

  • Color can play a large role in the formation of pattern
  • Pattern often appears in the form of geometric shapes, because kindergarten students “have developed a knowledge of lines and shapes” (Smith, 1998)
  • Pattern is created with the use of composition

 

Art Skills:

  • Students will use shaped sponges pressed in paint to create patterns on paper, because students “seek active experiences with materials and equipment” (Smith, 1998)
  • Students will arrange colors and shapes to create patterns in a composition, “children are able to create, repeat, and vary shapes” (Burton, 1980)
  • Students will apply their learning about patterns to art making, “the last stage of pre-representational learning, children are able to call on a considerable repertoire of understanding about what they can do” (Burton, 1980)

 

Guiding Questions:

  • What characteristics make a pattern? 
  • Does a pattern have to include only one shape? 
  • Does a pattern have to include only one color? 
  • Does a pattern have to be repeating? 
  • How many shapes make up a pattern?

 

Vocabulary:

  • Pattern: a repeated or alternating shape, color, or object
  • Repetition: when one shape is seen over and over agin, an aesthetic element occurring again in the same way or form
  • Alternating: when shapes or colors repeat in a regular rhythm with use of two or more colors or shapes. 

 

Materials:

  • tempera paint (two colors per table)
  • sponges, cut into shapes (at least 30)
  • construction paper (light colors)
  • white paper for experimenting
  • paper plates for the paint
  • cloths pins for hanging the works

 

Developmental Rationale:

  • (Nancy Smith, Observation Drawing with Children)Kindergarten- “seek active experiences with materials and equipment” “to experiment with and explore ideas, feelings, and relationships” “the world of me, myself and I expands to include others” “fantasy and reality remain blended” “have developed a knowledge of lines and shapes” “ discover that motions made with a tool on a surface create a mark...they can control their motions to make desired marks” “reducing what is seen into basic or simple shapes”
  • (Judith M. Burton, Beginnings of Artistic Language) “the first set of organized artistic behavior - adaptation of tool use” “they have made something where nothing was before” “repetition” “children are able to create, repeat, and vary shapes” “the last stage of pre-representational learning, children are able to call on a considerable repertoire of understanding about what they can do with materials”
  • (Lowenfeld, Stages of Self Expression) Pre-Schematic Stage (5-7 years) “Discovery of relationships between drawing, thinking, and reality” “search for concept involves evolution of imagery” “use of color shows no real relationship to reality” “The child sees the world differently than he draws it. He expresses what is actively important as he draws. Drawing at this stage are the child’s way of establishing a relationship of what he draws (and thinks) to reality.”
  • Artistic Needs - Learning about materials, learning about artistic processes, learning about different kinds of artistic processes, developing symbolic language, learning about particular visual concepts. 
  • (Gail Herman) Kinesthetic - feelings received from the muscles , joints, tendons, organs, skin, and viscera. A source of information about textures, effort, feelings, and spatial position” 
  • Kindergarten students, ages five to six, are visually exploring basic symbols and space. They create floating figures while exploring this idea of ground and space and use emotional color. They are focused on themselves, showing an egocentric point of view.
  • (Karen Lee Carroll, Better Practices in Visual Arts Education) “Enriching art content through reading” “Facilitating dialogue and discourse about student work” 

 

 

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.